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How wildlife (and human) corridors intersected at the January Gathering

January 27, 2017

When it comes to corridors, there are a multitude of paths that people from different sectors are traveling along to achieve varying goals. During our January Gathering, 180 attendees came together to learn about how the paths of conservation, policy, transportation, and recreation intersect each other, and how these sectors are using conservation strategies to balance priorities in their work. These strategies, while coming from varied angles, provided insight into how wildlife, vegetation, people, and even cars, can move more successfully alongside each other in the space that they all share.

 

Here are their presentations:

Tom Robinson, Director of Conservation, Science, and Innovation, Bay Area Open Space Council

Opening Remarks from OpenSpaceCouncil

 

Amy Golden, Senior Wildlife Biologist, Caltrans

Seeking Safe Passage: Integrating Fish and Wildlife Considerations into Caltrans Decisions and Processes from OpenSpaceCouncil

 

Country Larson, Ph.D. candidate and researcher, Colorado State University & Applied Conservation Science Lab

Balancing Public Access and Wildlife Conservation: Current Knowledge & Management Strategies from OpenSpaceCouncil

 

Attendees also got to see and touch interactive displays presented by exhibitors representing 8 different areas of study within our region. Follows the links to learn more about each project:

 

Exhibitors brought materials ranging from plaster molds of animal tracks, pelts, to a taxidermy mountain lion named Reggie who got quite a lot of attention. One was a scientist who manages a roadkill database. Here is some more information about this work:

 

For more camera trap goodness go here:

 

For more information:

 

On social, here are what people from the audience were saying with #OSCwildlife on Twitter:

 

Thanks to everyone who made this full house, well, very full. And everyone in the community doing important and innovative work around wildlife corridors.